San Francisco Community Health Center
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San Francisco Community Health Center’s LGBTQ+ Tobacco Control Program aims to reduce tobacco-related health disparities among the LGBTQ+ community through community health education, community organizing, and advocacy for tobacco-free policies in the San Francisco Bay Area. Components of this program include supporting local San Francisco Bay Area tobacco-control policies, working with local community colleges, development of LGBTQ+ specific tobacco health education materials, and community outreach/engagement.

UPDATE: COVID-19 and Tobacco

San Francisco Community Health Center recognizes this is a stressful time and people may find relief in smoking tobacco.  We know that respiratory issues are higher in the LGBTQ+ community and consequently LGBTQ+ people are likely experiencing greater health impacts from COVID-19. See the videos produced by our colleagues about reducing stress here (link to online health services https://sfcommunityhealth.org/online-health-services/).

Below is information for community members interested in reducing their tobacco use and/or family members who want to support someone trying to quit smoking, especially during these uncertain times. 

Resources

If you are thinking about changing your tobacco use:

·       Call 1-800-NO-BUTTS for phone counseling and free nicotine patches (if eligible)

·       Text “Quit Smoking” to 66819 for text-based counseling

·       SFCHC’s newly virtual transgender and non-binary class series “No Butts About It!” will begin shortly. Watch this page for details.

·       How to support someone when they decide to quit smoking (link to: https://lifehacker.com/how-to-support-someone-when-they-decide-to-quit-smoking-1705930730)

·       How Ex-Smokers Can Help Someone Quit (link to: https://www.webmd.com/smoking-cessation/features/mentor-quit-smoking#1)

Tobacco-use weakens the immune system and affects breathing. This makes a person susceptible to infections generally, and especially to respiratory infections like COVID-19. Secondhand smoke also affects people and pets around you. Practice physical distancing if possible. If you can smell it, you are breathing it.